Curriculum 2017

 

English

English Department

All students have five lessons of English a week. Year 7 are taught in mixed ability groups.  Through the study of language and literature, we aim to foster independent thinkers who can ‘think outside the box’, and inspire creative thought.

Exposure to a range of literary heritage texts, modern texts, and texts from different cultures challenges students to think critically about the world around them. We have a firm belief in inclusive education, and ensure that all students are given the opportunity to succeed, no matter what their starting point.

Two pieces of prep are set per week. One is to be completed during the PREP session and the other is a reading homework, to be completed over the weekend.

In Yr 7 students study:

Of Mice and Men – students develop their critical analysis and critical writing skills through a study of the Gothic creative writing – students explore generic conventions of Gothic writing though reading extracts from The Red Room, The Raven and others. They also explore narrative structure before planning and writing their own narrative.

The Terrible Fate of Humpty Dumpty – through the study of this play, students explore how dramatic devices such as foreshadowing, soliloquy, breaking the fourth wall contribute to the overall meaning of the text.   Poetry from different cultures – students study the poems Hurricane Hits England, Presents from My Aunts in Pakistan, Half-Caste, Island Man, Search for My Tongue and Nothing’s Changed to explore how poets use poetry to explore their own different cultural experiences, exam preparation – students use a range of text to prepare them for the AQA Key Stage 3 language exams, end of year marketing project – students develop their oracy and their persuasive writing skills by writing and presenting a marketing campaign.

Science

Science Department

Students in Year 7 are taught three periods of Science each week in mixed ability groups. The year starts with an introduction to Science and safety and is followed by a broad curriculum, based on ten major themes in Science: Forces, Electromagnets, Energy, Waves, Matter, Reactions, Earth, Organisms, Ecosystem and Genes.

The Springwest Learner skills are integral to the KS3 Scheme of Work.

There is one formal summative assessment each half term which consists of a range of questions testing student’s recall, understanding and application of Science topics. Students also sit an end of year Science test during the summer exam week. Students are informally assessed throughout the year by their teacher and good use is made of self and peer assessment through STAR activities.

PREP is set once a week for both Year 7 and 8 and may consist of a learning task, such as a knowledge test, a skill based task such as numeracy practice or an application or extension task.

Geography

Geography 

At KS3, students receive 2 lessons of Geography per week. In Years 7 and 8, classes are taught in mixed ability form groups whilst in Year 9 they are streamed based on ability. In Geography at Springwest, we offer topics that are contemporary and we incorporate many geographical skills into our topics, especially map work, graphical and numerical skills and analysis as well as fieldwork.

Year 7 study topics on Geographical Skills, China and Climate Change.

History

History 

At KS3, students have 2 lessons a week. They are taught in their form groups; mixed ability classes. 
In Year 7 and  indeed across all teaching in the History department, the development of Historical skills is a core focus. In Year 7 students study British History and the changing nature of monarchy in the British Isles.

Each Springwest Learner skill is assessed in isolation and each student is given a current level by their class teacher each half term or following end of term examinations. Students are also required to reflect personally on their progress in the Springwest Learner after each assessment.
At KS3 students receive one PREP sheet each week completed during PREP time.

Religious Education

Students receive one lesson of Religious Education per week.  At KS3 students study the 6 major world religions linked to different themes. In Year 7, students study Christianity with the theme of love and focus on the life of Jesus where they have an opportunity to discuss ideas about love as shown in Corinthians.  Judaism with a theme of leadership, Judaism covers the stories of Abraham, Moses and Esther and what made them good leaders. Hinduism related to the soul Hinduism involves the study of concepts relating to the soul, such as Moksha, Atman and reincarnation. This topic involves a discussion on What is the soul? And Do we have a soul?

PSHE

PSHE

The personal development and  wellbeing of students always features as part of our academy key priorities. We believe that this is the bedrock of good mental and physical health. Consequently students can engage with their academic learning better. PHSE is currently delivered through 2 strands in Year 7. From September 2017 students will have a weekly PHSE lesson taught by the Year 7 tutor team. An example of the curriculum is the fiction text, ‘GrangeEnders’, which allows  students to learn relevant adolescent issues in a contemporary and engaging manner.   In addition to this Year 7 have Red Days throughout the year which allow students to explore PHSE topics in greater depth. In Year 8 & 9 PHSE is delivered through form time sessions c. every two weeks. These sessions are complemented by the assembly programme as well as the Red Day provision.

MFL

French & Spanish KS3

Students are taught either French or Spanish on entry to Year 7. A language is allocated to each form at random & students study that language throughout KS3 and into KS4 as an option. Students in Years 7,  have 3 language lessons per week. Prep is set once a week, the focus of which is independent learning, either to reinforce classwork or prepare them for the next stage of the course.
Currently teachers base much of their teaching on Pearson’s Activteach materials (Studio & Viva), across the four skills of Listening, Reading, Speaking & Writing, and in both languages.  Alongside these, many materials developed by teachers in the department are regularly used.  Students are assessed at the end of each module.

French

Year 7

My Family and I, At School, Free Time, Where I live, Holidays, Revision and Film Module

Spanish

Myself, My free time, My secondary school, My city

Creative Arts & Technology

Creative Arts & Technology

Art

Art & Design is part of a rotation with Resistant Materials and Food Technology.  Students have 3 periods a week in Year 7.  The course attempts to ensure that when students reach the end of Year 9 they have experienced a wide range of materials, processes and techniques which will ensure they are engaged, inspired and challenged.  This helps to equip pupils with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. 
Areas of study:   Basic Skills, Portraits – Learning to draw a real face, Mark Making – Developing a visual language, Colour Theory – Building on prior knowledge

Design - Resistant Materials

Unit one – Students manufacture an Instagram Picture Frame to develop their motor skills. Students learn the basic principles of marking out and shaping. Key tools used in the manufacture of the project include steel ruler, try-square, coping saw, sanding block and jack plane.

Food

Basic introduction to food and nutrition, cooking skills, health and safety. There is an emphasis on cooking a basic meal.

 Dance and Music

Students  receive 1 lesson of Dance a week, this is taught in form groups.  Students are assessed in line with the Springwest Academy Learner Skills each half term, ensuring they are sufficiently challenged throughout the year. The practical, theoretical and contextual study of dance as an art form contributes to pupils’ artistic, physical, aesthetic, cultural, and social development. Students follow varying units of work across year 7 beginning with an introduction to the ingredients of dance; action, space, dynamics and relationships as well as looking at professional choreographers.
The complexity of the units increase alongside the need for students to recognise and achieve the highest quality in the three strands of Performance, Composition and Appreciation. The units within the scheme are taught in sequence, and are designed to offer a broad, balanced and progressive dance experience. Students are regularly tested within their lessons to be collaborative, inquisitive and  independent and through regular formative and summative assessments, reflective learners.

Areas of study: 

Introduction to Dance: Actions, space, dynamic, relationship

Technical skills – Flexibility, posture and alignment, balance, strength, stamina

Performance skills – Projection, focus, musicality, relationships 

Music - rhythm and beat, introduction to genres       

Drama

Students have one lesson of Drama a week which is taught in form groups. The topics studied range from acting skills and techniques to issue based topics where Drama is used as a tool to explore a theme or issue. The Springwest Learner skills are embedded throughout the content, but come naturally with some of the transferable skills we aim to teach throughout the course. These range from confidence building exercises to presentation skills.

Areas of study:

Basic Skills of Acting – Creating a character.

Darkwood Manor – A narrative based scheme of work.

Improvisation, Titanic – Social Divide, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Collaborative Project – Devising from a stimulus.

PE

PE

The KS3 Physical Education curriculum has been developed to give all students a broad and balanced development of the sports they may have covered at primary school. The aim of the curriculum is to provide a solid basis to engage students in physical activity and exercise through both team and individual sports where they have the opportunity to develop these further through the extra-curricular programme. At KS3 there is a real focus on the development of skills and tactics, evaluation of performance and leadership.

Year 7 and 8 will cover a range of sports from the following on a set rotation: Athletics, Badminton, Basketball (boys), Cricket (boys), Football, Gymnastics, Hockey, Netball (girls), Rounders (girls), Rugby Union, Short Tennis and Softball.

ICT

Information Technology 

Students in Year 7 receive 1 lesson of IT each week that is taught to mixed ability groups. The course begins with an introduction and familiarisation with the Academies network so that they are able to make use of the facilities either during lessons, lunch or other supervised periods. Students are issued with a Google email addresses and learn how to use G-Suite Apps such as Gmail, Classroom, Docs, Sheets and Slides. Alongside this students are also taught the importance of digital awareness and how to keep themselves safe online.


The Springwest Learner skills are embedded through the content that is taught. Students learn how to use the ‘share’ facility on Google. This allows them to collaborate on documents with each other both in small peer to peer groups and as a class. The learn how to reflect on their own work and that of others through the use of ‘comments’ within G-Suite. The internet is a great source of information but students must be able to ask the ‘right’ questions and be able to critique responses they find. We link this to the skill of inquisitiveness and develop student’s problem solving ability.
Assessments take place each term and focus on both theoretical and practical understanding. As such assessments contain multiple choice questions as well an online assignment. The online assessment could be to create a specific type of document and submit attached it to an email for example.
Students do not receive explicit PREP from IT but are able to access and extend their work in their own time.

English

English Department

In Year 8 students receive 5 lessons of English a week and are set according to ability.

Through the study of language and literature, we aim to foster independent thinkers who can ‘think outside the box’, and inspire creative thought.

Exposure to a range of literary heritage texts, modern texts, and texts from different cultures challenges students to think critically about the world around them. We have a firm belief in inclusive education, and ensure that all students are given the opportunity to succeed, no matter what their starting point.

Two pieces of prep are set per week. One is to be completed during the PREP session and the other is a reading homework, to be completed over the weekend.

Students will study:

Woman in Black: Students develop their critical analysis of language and structure, and their critical writing skills through the study of this novel.

Dystopian creative writing: students study extracts from 1984, Brave New World, The Hunger Games, poetry and the short story Harrison Bergenon to explore the genre and narrative structure before planning and writing their own narrative

The writing of Charles Dickens: Students study extracts from Oliver Twist, Great Expectations and some of Dickens' non fiction pamphlets to develop their knowledge of Dickens' world and the impact this had on his writing and perspective, as well as develop their confidence to read and analyse nineteenth century fiction and non-fiction.

Macbeth: students develop their critical analysis and writing skills. They consider the text in performance, analysing directorial choice and the impact this has on the audience. They also explore some literary criticism and use this to inform their own reading of the play.

End of year exam preparation: students study a range of texts and develop their descriptive writing skills to prepare them for the AQA Key Stage 3 language exams.

End of year Room 101 project: students develop their oracy and transactional writing skills by writing and performing a speech explaining what they would consign to room 101.

SPAG is addressed in weekly writing lessons.

Science

Science Department

Students in Year 8 are taught four periods of Science a week in classes broadly arranged by ability. The curriculum builds on the major themes introduced in Year 7, increasing the complexity and introducing more abstract topics - Forces, Electromagnets, Energy, Waves, Matter, Reactions, Earth, Organisms, Ecosystem and Genes.

The Springwest Learner skills are integral to the KS3 Scheme of Work. Each unit of work has a Springwest Learner focus. 

There is one formal summative assessment each half term which consists of a range of questions testing student’s recall, understanding and application of Science topics. Students also sit an end of year Science test during the summer exam week. Students are informally assessed throughout the year by their teacher and good use is made of self and peer assessment through STAR activities. PREP is set once a week for both Year 7 and 8 and may consist of a learning task, such as a knowledge test, a skill based task such as numeracy practice or an application or extension task. 

Geography

Geography Department

At KS3, students receive 2 lessons of Geography per week. In Years 7 and 8, classes are taught in mixed ability form groups whilst in Year 9 they are streamed based on ability. In Geography at Springwest, we offer topics that are contemporary and we incorporate many geographical skills into our topics, especially map work, graphical and numerical skills and analysis as well as fieldwork.

In Year 8, the topics include Rainforests, Development and Rivers.

There are two assessments for each Geographic topic. The first undertaken half-way through the unit, the second, a more formal assessment, is undertaken at the end of the topic, All assessments are tracked throughout the year and reported to parents every term. Each Springwest leaner skill is used throughout each topic and are assessed and tracked.
Students receive PREP once every week, which summarises and consolidates the students’ learning of the week.

History

History Department

At KS3, students have 2 lessons a week. Year 8 are taught in their form groups; mixed ability classes. 
In Year 8 and indeed across all teaching in the History department, the development of Historical skills is a core focus.  Our guiding themes in year 8 are the development of Empire and equality around the world.
Each Springwest Learner skill is assessed in isolation and each student is given a current level by their class teacher each half term or following end of term examinations. Students are also required to reflect personally on their progress in the Springwest Learner after each assessment.
At KS3 students receive one PREP sheet each week completed during PREP time.

Culture & Society

CS has two major components; Religious Education and Citizenship/PSHE. Within RE, students study the six major world religions linked to different themes. 

In Year 8, students study Buddhism whilst considering the theme of happiness and Sikhism related to equality. Students also study Islam in Year 8, learning about the Five Pillars of Islam, with a special focus on Zakah or giving to charity. Within Buddhism, students have a chance to discuss big questions such as What is happiness?, What causes suffering? And Do we have a duty to relieve the suffering of others? How Buddhists respond to these questions is covered by addressing the Noble Eightfold Path, the Four Sights of Suffering and the Four Noble Truths. In Sikhism, students have the opportunity to discuss questions such as Are all people equal? and How can we promote equality? Sikh practices such as the Langar Meal and Sewa are discussed in relation to these questions. Finally, within Islam, students discuss Islamic practices such as Salah, praying five times a day, the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and the practice of Zakah that Muslims give 2.5% of their annual earnings to charity. Students have the opportunity to discuss the meaning of charity and why it is important.

In CS, emphasis is placed on creating a safe environment in which students can discuss relevant and important issues, including those in the media today and current dialogues between religious and non-religious people. Students are encouraged to engage in discussions and debates whilst being sensitive to other views that people hold. Students also have opportunities to study ethical and philosophical issues.

MFL

French & Spanish 

Students are taught either French or Spanish according to which language they studied in Year 7. They have 3 language lessons per week. In Year 8 students are put into sets according to their ability, based on both Year 7 assessments and classwork, however students may move between sets as the academic year progresses. Prep is set once a week, the focus of which is independent learning, either to reinforce classwork or prepare them for the next stage of the course.
Currently teachers base much of their teaching on Pearson’s Activteach materials (Studio & Viva), across the four skills of Listening, Reading, Speaking & Writing, and in both languages.  Alongside these, many materials developed by teachers in the department are regularly used. In Years 8  we are able to use both levels of Activteach to differentiate activities for particular sets and students. Students are assessed at the end of each module.

French

Technology, Paris, I Love you, Fashion, My Home, Going Out and Film Module

Spanish

All about my life, Food, What are we doing &Fashion, Spanish speaking countries and My holidays

Creative Arts & Technology

Art

Art & Design is part of a rotation with Resistant Materials and Food Technology.  Students have 2 periods a week in Year 8.  The course attempts to ensure that when students reach the end of Year 9 they have experienced a wide range of materials, processes and techniques which will ensure they are engaged, inspired and challenged.  This helps to equip pupils with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. 

Areas of study -  Deepening Your Learning, Cubism – Exploring multiple viewpoints, Abstract Painting – Using technology for inspiration, Weaving – Textile based outcomes, Cultural Identity – exploring your own culture and identity

Resistant Materials

In Design Technology students receive  2 lessons per week in year 8 for four weeks. Students in Design Technology are taught in mixed ability groups. 
At key stage 3 students begin with an introduction to the workshop where they will learn health and safety aspects along with an introduction to the tools and machinery which they will use throughout the year. This is then followed by a design and make project developing students creative and practical skills along with their understanding of the design process.

Food

Developing menus with a focus on healthy eating.  Building cooking skills set and ability to construct a menu

Dance

Students  receive 1 lesson of Dance a week, this is taught in form groups.  Students are assessed in line with the Springwest Academy Learner Skills each half term, ensuring they are sufficiently challenged throughout the year. The practical, theoretical and contextual study of dance as an art form contributes to pupils’ artistic, physical, aesthetic, cultural, and social development. Students follow varying units of work across year 8.

Ingredients of Dance

  1. Ingredients of Dance: Actions, space, dynamic, relationship, choreographic devices. Technical and Expressive skills.
  2. Group choreography in the style of Hofesh Schecter: Contact work and weight bearing movement
  3. Using a range of stimulus to create group compositions: visual, auditory and kinesthetic
  4. Performance piece in the style of a professional work
  5. Choreographic exploration
  6. Individual Project: Mock GCSE style choreography and performance paper

Drama

Students have one lesson of Drama a week which is taught in form groups. The topics studied range from acting skills and techniques to issue based topics where Drama is used as a tool to explore a theme or issue. The Springwest Learner skills are embedded throughout the content, but come naturally with some of the transferable skills we aim to teach throughout the course. These range from confidence building exercises to presentation skills.

Year 8

  1. War & Conflict – Evacuees
  2. Mime/Silent Movies
  3. Genre
  4. West Side Story
  5. Introduction to Scripts
  6. Collaborative Project – Devising or Script Work

 

PE

PE 

The KS3 Physical Education curriculum has been developed to give all students a broad and balanced development of the sports they may have covered at primary school. The aim of the curriculum is to provide a solid basis to engage students in physical activity and exercise through both team and individual sports where they have the opportunity to develop these further through the extra-curricular programme. At KS3 there is a real focus on the development of skills and tactics, evaluation of performance and leadership.

Year  8 will cover a range of sports from the following on a set rotation: Athletics, Badminton, Basketball (boys), Cricket (boys), Football, Gymnastics, Hockey, Netball (girls), Rounders (girls), Rugby Union, Short Tennis and Softball.

During Year 9 students transition to becoming GCSE Ready. In many subjects this can entail the teaching of GCSE content or further honing of our Springwest Learner skills to provide a foundation for effective Key Stage 4 learning. At this point students will ‘opt’ to specialise in one of our Creative Arts subjects in preparation for GCSE.

English

English Department

Students begin their GCSE course in year nine by developing familiarity with set texts and Language papers.

In Year 9 students study:

Unseen poetry - students begin the year with a short unit on unseen poetry. They revise poetic devices covered in Key Stage 3 and are introduced to the more complex terms they will use at GCSE.

A Christmas Carol - students explore the plot and character of the novel. They focus on developing a clear understanding of the text and developing their own sustained arguments about characters within it. Students also continue to develop their critical writing technique, focusing on how to construct an argument about a particular character. Within the unit, students also continue to develop their creative writing skills.

Romeo and Juliet - students explore the plot and character of the play.

Language Paper 2 - students learn how to summarise information, analyse the language and compare the writer's perspectives of two unseen texts. One will always be from the 20th or 21st century and the other will always be from the nineteenth century. Students will also develop their transactional writing skills.

End of year speech challenge - students develop their oracy by writing and presenting a 2-3 minute speech on a topic of their choice.

Science

Science Department

Students in Year 9 are taught four periods of Science a week in classes broadly arranged by ability. The year is dedicated to building a strong foundation and preparing students to be successful at GCSE. The students study three fundamental concepts in Science, Cell biology, Atomic structure and the Periodic table and Energy, with a focus on skills, understanding and the process of acquiring knowledge.

Students in Year 9 have a formal summative assessment every half term. Students also sit two end of year Science tests during the summer exam week. Students are informally assessed throughout the year by their teacher and good use is made of self and peer assessment through STAR activities.

PREP is set once a week for Year 9 and may consist of a learning task, such as a knowledge test, a skill based task such as numeracy practice or an application or extension task.

 

Geography

Geography Department

At KS3, students receive 2 lessons of Geography per week. In  Year 9 students are streamed based on ability. In Geography at Springwest, we offer topics that are contemporary and we incorporate many geographical skills into our topics, especially map work, graphical and numerical skills and analysis as well as fieldwork.

In Year 9 we teach a water-downed GCSE course to prepare our students for the demands expected them at KS4. The topics include Coasts, Urban Geography and Natural Hazards.

There are two assessments for each Geographic topic. The first undertaken half-way through the unit, the second, a more formal assessment, is undertaken at the end of the topic, All assessments are tracked throughout the year and reported to parents every term.  Students receive PREP once every week, which summarises and consolidates the students’ learning of the week. 

History

History 

At KS3, students have 2 lessons a week and students in year 9 are streamed based on ability.

In year 9, pupils learn about warfare and politics in the 20th century world. They will uncover what caused the start of World War One before going onto to discover how the events which followed the outbreak of war in 1914, would come to shape a century of troubles around the world.


Each Springwest Learner skill is assessed in isolation and each student is given a current level by their class teacher each half term or following end of term examinations. Students are also required to reflect personally on their progress in the Springwest Learner after each assessment.
At KS3 students receive one PREP sheet each week completed during PREP time.

Culture & Society

Culture and Society

CS is taught 2 lessons a week and provides a foundation for RE as an option at GCSE.  Focus of study is Christianity and Islam.  

MFL

French & Spanish KS3

Students have 3 language lessons per week and are in sets according to their ability, based on previous work and assessemnts, however students may move between sets as the academic year progresses. Prep is set once a week, the focus of which is independent learning, either to reinforce classwork or prepare them for the next stage of the course.
Currently teachers base much of their teaching on Pearson’s Activteach materials (Studio & Viva), across the four skills of Listening, Reading, Speaking & Writing, and in both languages.  Alongside these, many materials developed by teachers in the department are regularly used. In Year 9 we are able to use both levels of Activteach to differentiate activities for particular sets and students. Students are assessed at the end of each module.

French

Social Life, Daily Routine, Health, The Future, Holidays and Film Module

Spanish

This is us, The world of work, Keeping in shape and Daily routine, Young people in action - volunteering and My secondary school

Creative Arts & Technology

Creative Arts & Technology

Art

KS3 Art & Design is part of a rotation with Resistant Materials and Food Technology.  Students have 2 periods a week in Year 9.  The course attempts to ensure that when students reach the end of Year 9 they have experienced a wide range of materials, processes and techniques which will ensure they are engaged, inspired and challenged.  This helps to equip pupils with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design.  

Students study -Becoming GCSE Ready,  School Production – Creating advertising and props for the whole school production,  Photography – Exploring Photography and moving beyond the selfie, Fine Art – Exploring painting at a deeper level

Dance

 Choreography and Performance

  1. Group choreography in the style of the professional work Perfect – Motionhouse
  2. Performance in a trio
  3. Choreography and performance based upon a prescribed stimulus
  4. How to choreograph a solo
  5. Set dance
  6. Individual project: Dance companies – Mock GCSE style choreography and performance paper

Drama

  1. Skills for GCSE – Mediums & Elements
  2. Explorative Strategies
  3. Script Writing
  4. Mock Unit 1 Theme: Celebrity Culture
  5. Mock Unit 2: Teechers John Godber
  6. Mock Unit 3: Extended Devising Project

Resistant Materials

Year 9 – Unit one – Formula one car. Students design and make their own forumala one car. Key processes include trenching and planning. Students are introduced to perspective drawing and orthographic projection.

Unit two – Mug tree – Students are introduced to the mortise and tennon joint.  Other key processes include learning how to cut at an angle and a range of cross halving joints. Focus on different species and categories of wood. Students learn about the structure of wood.

Unit three – Pencil Holder – Students learn to plane at an angle and a curve. Students are introduced to the concept of isometric drawing.

Unit Four – Trinket box – Students design and make a trinket box using a finger joint. Students are challenged to design their own mechanism. Students have to research alternative joints that could be used carcass manufacture.

PE

PE

In Year 9 the students help in the process of developing their own curriculum to build on their prior learning in year 7 and 8. Students are able to select as a class the activities they wish to use to learn through. For example, mixed team games – to develop tactical understanding and strategies, fitness training – to develop an understanding of physical activity and its role in a healthy balanced lifestyle, cricket – to develop specific striking and fielding skills within the specific game.

English

English Department

Students are set according to ability. All Key Stage Four students have five periods of English per week. We follow the AQA specifications for Language and Literature. Although all students study the same set texts, careful thought is given to the pedagogical approach needed to challenge the most able.  In year ten, students develop their critical response. As with Key Stage three, a weekly writing task supports students’ ability to write developed responses in exam conditions, about which students receive regular feedback. Lessons begin with a ‘five a day’ starter which encourages recall and knowledge retention. As well as regular, informal feedback, students are assessed formally at the end of each unit of work, and through two periods of mocks in each year. Two pieces of PREP are set per week. One is a flipped learning task to be completed during prep and the other is a revision task – to be completed over the weekend and tested during the Monday lesson.

Students study:

    Unseen poetry, Power and Conflict poetry, Christmas Carol (themes), Romeo and Juliet (themes), Inspector Calls, Language paper 2 revision, spoken language endorsement

Science

Science 

Students in Year 10 and 11 are taught five periods of Science each week in classes arranged by ability. All students in sets 1 to 4 follow the AQA GCSE Science Trilogy Specification, students in set 5 are co-taught GCSE Science and AQA Entry level Science.

The Year 10 scheme of work covers Biology (Organisation, Infection and response, Bioenergetics, Homeostasis and response), Chemistry (Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter, Quantitative chemistry, Chemical changes, Energy changes, The rate and extent of chemical change) and Physics (Electricity, Particle model of matter, Atomic structure).

Students in Year 10 have a formal summative assessment every half term. In the summer term of Year 10 students sit a GCSE mock examination in each of the three Science subjects. Students are informally assessed throughout the year by their teacher and good use is made of self and peer assessment through STAR activities.

PREP is set twice a week for Year 10 and 11 and consists of knowledge test and a task to secure, apply and extend the topics covered in class.

Geography

Geography Department

KS4

At KS4, students receive 4 lessons of Geography per week, which are taught in mixed ability groups. Students at Springwest follow the new 9-1 Edexcel B Specification. There are three components investigate that cover the two aspects of Global Geographic Issues, UK Geography and fieldwork. Fieldwork is compulsory for the new GCSE specification and our students are expected to do two different one-day fieldwork experiences throughout the two years.
At the end of each topic, students are assessed using a past paper from the topic just covered. All assessments are tracked throughout the year and reported to parents every term.

Students receive PREP twice every week, which summarises and consolidates the students’ learning, with a series of past GCSE questions that need to be answered.

History

History Department

At KS4 students have 4 lessons of History a week. History follows the Edexcel exam board and teach topics on Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, Medicine Through Time, Weimar and Nazi Germany, and Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-1991.
In Years 10 and 11 students are assessed regularly both on exam technique and knowledge requirements. This is achieved through a combination of mock exams, and knowledge tests.
Students are set a 1 hour PREP task once a week at GCSE level. This could be a mixture of reading and comprehension, exam style questions or facts to learn in order to prepare for knowledge tests.

MFL

Modern Foreign Languages Department

Students in Year 10 and 11 have 4 language lessons per week and continue with the language studied at KS3.  Students sit Edexcel 9-1 GCSE in French & Spanish for the first time. Lessons focus on the 4 skills required at GCSE (see above) and are assessed at the end of each module. As at KS3, teachers use Pearson’s materials for both French and Spanish, Viva and Studio, for the basis of our KS4 curriculum and use in-house materials in conjunction with this.

Students are loosely set where timetabling and option choices allow, however groups contain a range of abilities who will eventually sit either Foundation or Higher papers at the end of the course.
Prep is set twice a week and usually one of these is allocated to vocabulary learning.
Mocks take place at the end of Year 10.

PE

KS4

All students will continue to participate in core Physical Education until the end of KS4. Students have more scope in choosing their activities and trying alternative sports and activities which have a real focus on development of previously learnt skills and developing a more holistic life-long engagement in sport and physical activity.

At KS4, students have the opportunity to opt for a GCSE following the Edexcel syllabus. The Edexcel GCSE PE course includes: Healthy Active Lifestyles, Influences on Participation, Exercise, Drugs in Sport, and Anatomy and Physiology units.

Creative Arts

Creative Arts Department

Art and Photography GCSE

Students are able to select from 2 different visual arts pathways; Fine Art or Photography. At KS4 students have 3 periods each week for Year 10 and 4 for Year 11, and at KS5 they have 5 periods per week.  There are two main exam boards that are used, AQA and EDXCEL.  Each of these boards specifications directly support progression to further and higher education in Art and Design and related subjects, as well as providing all students with a platform to inspire a lifelong interest in, and enjoyment of Art and Design. GCSE Art and Photography provides students with a wide range of creative, exciting and stimulating opportunities to explore their interests in ways that are both personally relevant and developmental in nature.  The courses are divided into 2 units (Unit 1: Portfolio of Work Controlled Assessment, 60 per cent and Unit 2: Externally Set Task 40 per cent).  These two units enable students to develop their ability to build creative skills through learning and doing, to develop imaginative and intuitive ways of working and develop knowledge and understanding of media, materials and technologies in historical and contemporary contexts, societies and cultures. Prep is set in Art on a rolling program and normally consists of observational drawing tasks or artist research.  Photography Students do not receive explicit PREP but are able to access and extend their work through their Google accounts in their own time.

Dance

Students in Year 10 receive 3 lessons of GCSE Dance each week.  In Year 11 students receive 4 lessons of Dance each week. Students study the AQA GCSE Dance specification. The AQA specification recognises the role of dance in young people’s lives and students will study a range of dance styles and style fusions. The study of the anthology of professional works will develop their ability to critically appraise professional dance works and provide a springboard for engaging practical tasks. The written assessment in this specification is clear, well-structured and easy for students to understand. Students will experience a variety of question styles, which include multiple choice, short and extended answers.
Students must complete two assessment components; Component 1: Performance and choreography (internally marked and externally moderated) and Component 2: Dance appreciation (written exam).
Students in Year 10 and 11 receive two pieces of PREP a week: one focusing on the questions relating to the anthology of professional works, the other a practical PREP whereby students will be expected to participate in whole group or one-to-one extracurricular sessions supported by the teacher.

Drama

Students have 3 lessons of Drama a week and we follow the Edexcel specification. The course is made up of 3 components; a devising project, the performance of a script to a visiting examiner and a written exam based on a play studied and a piece of live theatre the students will have seen. Students are assessed half termly depending on the scheme of work and have a mock practical and written exam at the end of the Autumn and Spring terms. Students achieve two pieces of PREP a week.  One reflecting on the practical sessions (which form part of their assessed log) and one based on exam skills. The course is designed to cover a wide range of theatre aspects as well as engage in a range of texts both classic and modern. The 3 components also develop a multitude of skills including collaboration, communication and an understanding of how to amend and refine work in order to make a smooth transition to the next level of study.

 

Vocational Courses

Vocational Courses

CACHE LEVEL 2- EARLY YEARS

The Early Years Department offers the NCFE CACHE Level 2 Award in Child Development and Care at Key Stage 4. Students in year 10 and 11 receive 4 lessons each week. This qualification provides the opportunity to gain a vocational qualification that gives a basic introduction to working in the early years sector alongside a GCSE. It includes the knowledge and understanding of child development and their well-being necessary for working with children in a variety of settings. Students learn the importance of observing children, planning routines, safeguarding children, the role of the practitioner, theorists and other approaches to care and learning. The classroom environment enables students to be active in their own learning, discovering the benefits of children learning through play and enabling them to reflect on their own practice to meet the individual needs of young children. Students also have the opportunity to visit some of the early years settings on site to support them with their professional practice and gain a real insight into working with staff and young children.
Students complete two graded assessment tasks, and a multiple choice exam paper in year 11. Students receive weekly PREP to support prior learning and ‘flipped learning’ tasks to prepare them for a new topic.

NCFE LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATE IN HEALTH AND FITNESS

This qualification is designed for learners with an interest in any of the health and fitness contexts such as exercise, lifestyles and diet. Level 2 is appropriate for learners who are looking to develop a significant core of knowledge and understanding, and want to apply that knowledge in preparing, planning and developing a health and fitness programme.

Core Units

  • Principles of Health and Fitness
  • Healthy Lifestyles
  • Preparing and Planning for Health and Fitness
  • Develop a Personal Health and Fitness Programme

Unit 3 is externally assessed. The other units are coursework based.

Discounts PE

NCFE LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATE IN FOOD AND COOKERY

This qualification is designed for learners who have an interest in food and cookery. It will provide learners with experience of using different cooking techniques and methods to enable them to use these within further education or apprenticeships. It will give them a basic understanding of the skills required for a career in food.

Core Units

  • Preparing to Cook
  • Understanding Food
  • Exploring Balanced Diets
  • Plan and Produce Dishes in Response to a Brief

Unit 3 is externally assessed. The other units are coursework based.

NCFE LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATE IN ENGINEERING STUDIES

This qualification is designed for learners with an interest in engineering. It will provide learners with experience of using different tools and materials to enable them to use these within further education or apprenticeships. It will give them a basic understanding of what engineering may involve.

Core units

  • Introduction to Engineering
  • Introduction to Engineering Drawing
  • Tools and Equipment for Engineering
  • Engineering Materials and their Properties

Unit 2 is externally assessed. The other units are coursework based.

Discounts RM

 

BTEC FIRST IN TRAVEL AND TOURISM

BTEC Firsts in Travel and Tourism can help you take your first steps towards a career in retail or business travel. You’ll learn essential skills such as business awareness, customer service and understanding destinations in the UK and worldwide.

Core units

The UK Travel and Tourism Sector

UK Travel and Tourism Destinations

Plus 2 of the following units

The Development of Travel and Tourism in the UK

International Travel and Tourism Destinations

Factors Affecting Worldwide Travel and Tourism

The Travel and Tourism Customer Experience

Unit 1 is externally assessed. The other units are coursework based.

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English

English

Students are set according to ability. All Key Stage Four students have five periods of English per week. We follow the AQA specifications for Language and Literature. Although all students study the same set texts, careful thought is given to the pedagogical approach needed to challenge the most able.  Lessons in year eleven are structured according to the principles of interleaving. Students have two Literature, two Language and one ‘revision’ lesson per week. As with Key Stage three, a weekly writing task supports students’ ability to write developed responses in exam conditions, about which students receive regular feedback. Lessons begin with a ‘five a day’ starter which encourages recall and knowledge retention. As well as regular, informal feedback, students are assessed formally at the end of each unit of work, and through two periods of mocks in each year. Two pieces of PREP are set per week. One is a flipped learning task to be completed during prep and the other is a revision task – to be completed over the weekend and tested during the Monday lesson.

  • Students revise key texts and language skills every week, using the interleaving and spacing approach. There are two literature, two language and 1 revision lesson per week. Once every two weeks the students do one piece of writing in exam conditions

Science

Science Department

Students are taught five periods of Science each week in classes arranged by ability. All students in sets 1 to 4 follow the AQA GCSE Science Trilogy Specification, students in set 5 are co-taught GCSE Science and AQA Entry level Science.

The Year 11 scheme of work covers Biology (Bioenergetics, Ecology), Chemistry (Quantitative chemistry, Chemical changes, Energy changes) and Physics (Particle model of matter, Atomic structure, Magnetism and electromagnetism).

Students have a written test every four weeks formal summative assessment every half term. Year 11 have GCSE mock examinations at the end of the Autumn and Spring terms.

PREP is set twice a week and consists of knowledge test and a task to secure, apply and extend the topics covered in class.

Geography

Geography Department

At KS4, students receive 4 lessons of Geography per week, which are taught in mixed ability groups. Students at Springwest follow the new 9-1 Edexcel B Specification. There are three components investigate that cover the two aspects of Global Geographic Issues, UK Geography and fieldwork. Fieldwork is compulsory for the new GCSE specification and our students are expected to do two different one-day fieldwork experiences throughout the two years.
At the end of each topic, students are assessed using a past paper from the topic just covered. All assessments are tracked throughout the year and reported to parents every term.

Students receive PREP twice every week, which summarises and consolidates the students’ learning, with a series of past GCSE questions that need to be answered.

History

History Department

At KS4 students have 4 lessons of History a week. History follows the Edexcel exam board and teach topics on Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, Medicine Through Time, Weimar and Nazi Germany, and Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941-1991.


In Years 10 and 11 students are assessed regularly both on exam technique and knowledge requirements. This is achieved through a combination of mock exams, and knowledge tests.
Students are set a 1 hour PREP task once a week at GCSE level. This could be a mixture of reading and comprehension, exam style questions or facts to learn in order to prepare for knowledge tests.

MFL

Modern Foreign Languages Department

Students have 4 language lessons per week. Our students sit Edexcel 9-1 GCSE in French & Spanish for the first time. Lessons focus on the 4 skills required at GCSE (see above) and are assessed at the end of each module. As at KS3, teachers use Pearson’s materials for both French and Spanish, Viva and Studio, for the basis of our KS4 curriculum and use in-house materials in conjunction with this.

Students are loosely set where timetabling and option choices allow, however groups contain a range of abilities who will eventually sit either Foundation or Higher papers at the end of the course.
Prep is set twice a week and usually one of these is allocated to vocabulary learning.
Mocks take place in December & March.

Creative Arts & Resistant Materials

Creative Arts & Resistant Materials

Art and Photography

KS4/5 students are able to select from 2 different visual arts pathways; Fine Art or Photography. At KS4 students have 3 periods each week for Year 10 and 4 for Year 11, and at KS5 they have 5 periods per week.  There are two main exam boards that are used, AQA and EDXCEL.  Each of these boards specifications directly support progression to further and higher education in Art and Design and related subjects, as well as providing all students with a platform to inspire a lifelong interest in, and enjoyment of Art and Design. GCSE Art and Photography provides students with a wide range of creative, exciting and stimulating opportunities to explore their interests in ways that are both personally relevant and developmental in nature.  The courses are divided into 2 units (Unit 1: Portfolio of Work Controlled Assessment, 60 per cent and Unit 2: Externally Set Task 40 per cent).  These two units enable students to develop their ability to build creative skills through learning and doing, to develop imaginative and intuitive ways of working and develop knowledge and understanding of media, materials and technologies in historical and contemporary contexts, societies and cultures. Prep is set in Art on a rolling program and normally consists of observational drawing tasks or artist research.  Photography Students do not receive explicit PREP but are able to access and extend their work through their Google accounts in their own time.

Dance

Students in Year 10 receive 3 lessons of GCSE Dance each week.  In Year 11 students receive 4 lessons of Dance each week. Students study the AQA GCSE Dance specification. The AQA specification recognises the role of dance in young people’s lives and students will study a range of dance styles and style fusions. The study of the anthology of professional works will develop their ability to critically appraise professional dance works and provide a springboard for engaging practical tasks. The written assessment in this specification is clear, well-structured and easy for students to understand. Students will experience a variety of question styles, which include multiple choice, short and extended answers.
Students must complete two assessment components; Component 1: Performance and choreography (internally marked and externally moderated) and Component 2: Dance appreciation (written exam).Students  receive two pieces of PREP a week: one focusing on the questions relating to the anthology of professional works, the other a practical PREP whereby students will be expected to participate in whole group or one-to-one extracurricular sessions supported by the teacher.

Drama

Students have 3 lessons of Drama a week and we follow the Edexcel specification. The course is made up of 3 components; a devising project, the performance of a script to a visiting examiner and a written exam based on a play studied and a piece of live theatre the students will have seen. Students are assessed half termly depending on the scheme of work and have a mock practical and written exam at the end of the Autumn and Spring terms. Students achieve two pieces of PREP a week.  One reflecting on the practical sessions (which form part of their assessed log) and one based on exam skills. The course is designed to cover a wide range of theatre aspects as well as engage in a range of texts both classic and modern. The 3 components also develop a multitude of skills including collaboration, communication and an understanding of how to amend and refine work in order to make a smooth transition to the next level of study.

Resistant Materials

Key topics include – design brief analysis, materials and finishes research, product analysis. Students design their own GCSE project under the constraints of the design brief and learn how to evaluate their design solutions against a design specification. Other key concepts include perspective drawing, isometric drawing, orthographic projection, google sketch up and design evaluation.

Early Years

CACHE Level 2 – AN INTRODUCTION TO WORKING WITH CHILDREN IN EARLY YEARS SETTINGS

  1. Understand the types of settings and local provision for children.
  2. Key issues to consider when preparing for placement.
  3. Responsibilities of the early year’s worker, recognizing when they should refer to others.
  4. Inclusive practice and meeting children’s individual needs.
  5. reflecting on own preferred learning style.
  6. Case studies and confidentiality in the workplace.

Unit 1: An introduction to working with children aged 0-5

Unit 2: Development and well-being 0-5 years

Unit 3: Exam Childcare and development 0-5 years

 

Religious Education

Students take  the AQA Religious Studies A syllabus, they receive 4 lessons a week. Students are required to study the beliefs and practices of both Christianity and Islam in the first year of their course and will then study thematic studies as the second part of their course.  During the final year of this course they required to study four units: Relationships and families; Religion and life; Religion, peace and conflict; and Religion crime a KS4.

PE

All students will continue to participate in core Physical Education until the end of KS4. Students have more scope in choosing their activities and trying alternative sports and activities which have a real focus on development of previously learnt skills and developing a more holistic life-long engagement in sport and physical activity.

At KS4, students have the opportunity to opt for a GCSE following the Edexcel syllabus. The Edexcel GCSE PE course includes: Healthy Active Lifestyles, Influences on Participation, Exercise, Drugs in Sport, and Anatomy and Physiology units.

Students are streamed for mathematics and are taught content according to their ability rather than their age. We call this approach ‘Stage, not age’. Details of the content of each stage can be found below.

This table gives an indication as to the stage at which the students will be studying.

 Less able More able
Year 7Stage 2Stage 3Stage 4
Year 8Stage 3Stage 4Stage 5
Year 9Stage 4Stage 5Stage 6
Year 10Stage 5Stage 6Stage 7

Stage 2

  • Know the place value headings up to millions
  • Recall primes to 19
  • Know the first 12 square numbers
  • Know the Roman numerals I, V, X, L, C, D, M
  • Know percentage and decimal equivalents for 1/2, 1/4, 1/5, 2/5, 4/5
  • Know rough conversions between metric and Imperial units
  • Know that angles are measured in degrees
  • Know angles in one whole turn total 360°
  • Know angles in half a turn total 180°
  • Know that area of a rectangle = length × width

Stage 3

  • Know percentage and decimal equivalents for fractions with a denominator of 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 10
  • Know the rough equivalence between miles and kilometres
  • Know that vertically opposite angles are equal
  • Know that the area of a triangle = base × height ÷ 2
  • Know that the area of a parallelogram = base × height
  • Know that volume is measured in cubes
  • Know the names of parts of a circle
  • Know that the diameter of a circle is twice the radius
  • Know the conventions for a 2D coordinate grid
  • Know that mean = sum of data ÷ number of pieces of data

Stage 4

  • Know the first 6 cube numbers
  • Know the first 12 triangular numbers
  • Know the symbols =, ≠, <, >, ≤, ≥
  • Know the order of operations including brackets
  • Know basic algebraic notation
  • Know that area of a rectangle = l × w
  • Know that area of a triangle = b × h ÷ 2
  • Know that area of a parallelogram = b × h
  • Know that area of a trapezium = ((a + b) ÷ 2) × h
  • Know that volume of a cuboid = l × w × h
  • Know the meaning of faces, edges and vertices
  • Know the names of special triangles and quadrilaterals
  • Know how to work out measures of central tendency
  • Know how to calculate the range

Stage 5

  • Know how to write a number as a product of its prime factors
  • Know how to round to significant figures
  • Know the order of operations including powers
  • Know how to enter negative numbers into a calculator
  • Know that a0 = 1
  • Know percentage and decimal equivalents for fractions with a denominator of 3, 5, 8 and 10
  • Know the characteristic shape of a graph of a quadratic function
  • Know how to measure and write bearings
  • Know how to identify alternate angles
  • Know how to identify corresponding angles
  • Know how to find the angle sum of any polygon
  • Know that circumference = 2πr = πd
  • Know that area of a circle = πr²
  • Know that volume of prism = area of cross-section × length
  • Know to use the midpoints of groups to estimate the mean of a set of grouped data
  • Know that probability is measured on a 0-1 scale
  • Know that the sum of all probabilities for a single event is 1

Stage 6

  • Know how to interpret the display on a scientific calculator when working with standard form
  • Know the difference between direct and inverse proportion
  • Know how to represent an inequality on a number line
  • Know that the point of intersection of to lines represents the solution to the corresponding simultaneous equations
  • Know how to find the nth term of a quadratic sequence
  • Know the characteristic shape of the graph of a cubic function
  • Know the characteristic shape of the graph of a reciprocal function
  • Know the definition of speed
  • Know the definition of density
  • Know the definition of pressure
  • Know Pythagoras’ Theorem
  • Know the definitions of arc, sector, tangent and segment
  • Know the conditions for congruent triangles

Stage 7

  • Know the convention for labelling the sides in a right-angle triangle
  • Know the trigonometric ratios, sinθ = opposite/hypotenuse, cosθ = adjacent/hypotenuse, tanθ = opposite/adjacent
  • Know the exact values of sinθ and cosθ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90°
  • Know the exact value of tanθ for θ = 0°, 30°, 45° and 60°
  • Know that a^1/n = …
  • Know that a^-n = …
  • Know the information required to describe a transformation
  • Know the special case of the difference of two squares
  • Know how to set up an equation involving direct or inverse proportion
  • Know set notation
  • Know the conventions for representing inequalities graphically
  • Know the formulae for the volume of a sphere, a cone and a pyramid
  • Know the formulae for the surface area of a sphere, and the curved surface area of a cone
  • Know the circle theorems
  • Know the characteristic shape of the graph of an exponential function
  • Know the meaning of roots, intercepts and turning points
  • Know the definition of acceleration
  • Know the corresponding fraction for simple recurring decimals
  • Know how to construct a box plot
  • Know the conditions for perpendicular lines

In Year 11 all of the concepts from stage 1 to 7 are drawn together to form a structured body of knowledge to be applied to the GCSE examination.

Students in Year 10 and 11 receive 5 or 6 lessons of Maths each week. Students study the Edexcel 1MA1 specification and final decisions on entry into tiers (Higher or Foundation) are made after the Easter Mock in Year 11. Sets 1 and 2 follow a scheme aimed at the Higher paper, with other sets following a scheme that covers topics from both Tiers. Students in Set 1 also study a separate Statistics GCSE from Year 10.

As in lower school, students follow the Stage approach and all areas of maths (number, geometry, algebra and statistics) are studied with topics increasing in depth and difficulty as students progress through their GCSE course.
Students in Year 10 are assessed half termly, depending on their scheme of work, with a GCSE Mock at the end of the year. Year 11 have GCSE mocks at the end of the Autumn and Spring terms. Students in Year 10 and 11 receive two pieces of PREP a week: one focusing on revision and GCSE questions, the other an extension of a classwork topic.

Students participate in the annual Maths Challenges organised by the UKMT and are entered for the Junior, Intermediate and Senior challenges. The students enjoy considerable success, with a healthy number of Bronze, Silver and Gold certificates being awarded each year. We also select a team of year 8s to participate in the Intermediate and Senior Team Challenges respectively.

SubjectBoardSub CodeUnit NumbersName of UnitTeacher Responsible - email contact
      
Art & DesignAQA82018201CPersonal Portfolio in Art & Design t.gallahue@springwestacademy.org
   8201XExternally Set Assignment in Art & Design  
      
Art & Design - PhotographyAQA82068206CPersonal Portfolio in Photography t.gallahue@springwestacademy.org
   8206XExternally Set Assignment in Photography 
      
Child DevelopmentCACHENCFELevel 2Award in Child Development and Care a.sharkey@springwestacademy.org
      
DanceAQA8236Unit 1Performance s.tennant@springwestacademy.org
   Unit 2Choreography 
   Unit 3Dance Appreciation 
      
DramaEdexcel1DR01Unit 1Devising j.kelly@springwestacademy.org
   Unit 2Performance from Text 
   Unit 3Theatre Makers in Practice 
      
English LanguageAQA87008700/1Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing c.woodhouse@springwestacademy.org
   8700/2Writers' Viewpoints and Perspectives 
      
English LiteratureAQA87028702/1Shakespeare and the 19th-century Novel c.woodhouse@springwestacademy.org
   8702/2Modern texts and poetry 
      
EAL EnglishCIE511 units decided at time of entry m.taylor@springwestacademy.org
      
FrenchEdexcel1FR0Unit 1Listening j.roberts@springwestacademy.org
   Unit 2Speaking 
   Unit 3Reading 
   Unit 4Writing 
      
GeographyEdexcel1GB0Unit 1Global Geographical Issues s.corps@springwestacademy.org
   Unit 2UK Geography Issues 
   Unit 3People & Environment Issues 
      
HistoryEdexcel1H10Unit 1Option 11 s.jones@springwestacademy.org
   Unit 2Option 26 option B1 Anglo Saxon/Norman 
   Unit 3Option 31 
      
MathematicsEdexcel1MA11MA1 f or hFoundation or Higher 3 units c.mullins@springwestacademy.org
      
Physical EducationAQA8582 Paper 1/ Paper 2/ Practical a.jackson@springwestacademy.org
      
      
REAQA8062 2 units p.swandle@springwestacademy.org
      
Resistant MaterialsAQA456245601Written paper m.gomez@springwestacademy.org
   45602Design & making practice 
      
ScienceAQA8464Higher & FoundTriology of Science (3 papers) j.morgan@springwestacademy.org
      
SpanishEdexcel1SP0Unit 1Listening j.roberts@springwestacademy.org
   Unit 2Speaking 
   Unit 3Reading 
   Unit 4Writing 
      
Statistics Yr 10Edexcel1ST011ST01foundation or higher 2 units c.mullins@springwestacademy.org
      
      
Year 10 Btec     
Travel & Tourisum Btec Firstlevel 2  s.corps@springwestacademy.org
      
EngineeringNCFEVcertLevel 2  m.gomez@springwestacademy.org
      
Health & FitnessNCFEVcertLevel 2  m.hearn@springwestacademy.org
      
Food & CookeryNCFEVcertLevel 2  k.horoz@springwestacademy.org

Curriculum overview

At Springwest Academy, the governing body, the Principal and the staff have high expectations of students and challenge all to achieve. Passionate staff provide exciting learning environments in which students thrive. There is no better classroom than the one filled with inquisition; awash with a sea of questions from both staff and students, constantly seek to clarify, criticise and corroborate. Personal development and the wider curriculum exposes students to an extensive number of topics including mental health and society to politics. We seek to educate the ‘whole’ student so that he/she may aspire to, and achieve, the future they choose.

Key Stage 3

It is vital that students make a strong and effective transition from Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 3. As such we work closely with a number of our feeder schools to ensure that our curriculum aims and objectives accurately meet the needs of our learners. We are committed to challenging students with new content whilst ensuring that we deepen understanding in areas that they have already been exposed to.

Alongside content delivery we also focus on a specific set of skills referred to as the Springwest Learner. We believe students must acquire these to be GCSE ready. Students are taught these skills through lessons tasks and activities in all subjects. They also form the basis of the Key Stage 3 reports and are discussed with parent/carers at our parental engagement events.

The Springwest Learner looks at the following four areas:

Independence

Self reliance is at the heart of deep learning. Students must be able to self-motivate to wrestle with challenges before seeking support. Even then the process of getting ‘unstuck’ must be driven by the student; reading through class notes and previous material and gaining support from peers are important first steps before seeking advice from the teacher. This should also be extended outside the class so that students are able to effectively plan, prepare and research from home without the support of their teacher.

Inquisitiveness

We all learn best when we question and critique information we are presented with. Students are encouraged to ask questions when they do understand as well as when they don’t. Getting into the the ‘how’, ‘why’, ‘what if…’ mindset helps students to make strong links between different topics and even different subjects.

Collaboration

Working effectively with others allows us to get the best out of everyone. Often some of the best learning can come from interactions with our peers. In order for this to be successful students must be able to communicate effectively and a large part of this is actively listening to and respecting the views of others. We challenge students to be articulate and argue their point to others in meaningful debate.

Reflection

Being able to critically analyse our own performance allows us to make positive changes to our learning. Whether this be engaging with the range of feedback offered by class teachers, evaluating our own work or setting personal targets for development it is important to think before we act.

By focusing on these skills students become resilient learners capable of adapting to change and the increasing academic demands.

The KS3 curriculum in Years 7 & 8 provides a broad and balanced range of subjects with a strong emphasis on developing literacy and numeracy. Each student receives 25 hours teaching during a normal school week. Students are taught English, Mathematics, Science, Modern Foreign Languages (French or Spanish), Geography, History, RE, and PE along with Creative Arts; this comprises of Drama, Dance & Music, Art, Design Technology and Food Technology some of which are taught on rotation. IT and PSHE are also taught on rotation.

Students are taught in both streamed and mixed ability teaching groups, with a strong emphasis on teacher led differentiation and wave 1 intervention for any student not be progressing as they should. Assessment data that is collect by the school is used to create RAP groups. These are students that are identified as being ‘at risk’ or vulnerable through underachievement in a number of subjects. Staff are then required to outline the intervention that is being put in place to support these students in catching up. PREP is set by English, Maths, Science, Modern Foreign Languages, Geography and History and will typically consist of either knowledge consolidation tasks or preparatory tasks for the subsequent lesson.

Departments assess pupils to test knowledge acquisition as well as skills development and report back to Senior Leaders 3 times a year. Results are moderated by department, especially where they relate to our Springwest Learner skills. From these discussions changes can be implemented within the curriculum to focus on those skills requiring further development. Alongside departmental assessment we run End of Year Examinations for students in June of each year. We believe that through exposing students to these demands from Year 7 we are better placed to teach not only revision and preparation strategies but also to look at how we can support students to deal with stress and anxiety brought on by examinations. To this end departments create their End of Year Examinations from assessments that the students have already seen, either direct copies of questions to test knowledge recall or adaptations to test skills development.

 

 

 

Key Stage 4

During Year 9 students transition to becoming GCSE Ready. In many subjects this can entail the teaching of GCSE content or further honing of our Springwest Learner skills to provide a foundation for effective Key Stage 4 learning. At this point students will ‘opt’ to specialise in one of our Creative Arts subjects in preparation for GCSE.

Year 10 and 11 students study a broad but academically rigorous curriculum. Nearly all students study English, Maths, Science and Modern Foreign Languages and at least one Humanity; these are not only vital subjects for securing a place in Higher Education but also for being highly functional within our global society.  Additional subjects depend upon the pathway on which the student has been placed. PE is taught to all students with an increased emphasis on developing sporting interests that students will continue with after leaving us.

In Years 9, 10 and 11, students are generally set by ability or grouped according to their individual choice of study or pathway. Again, there is a strong emphasis on teacher led differentiation and wave 1 intervention for any student not be progressing as they should.

Outside of class students complete PREP in all examined subjects at Key Stage 4. There in an increased expectation that students spend more time on this work at outside of school as the quantity of work given will exceed the time allocated during timetabled PREP sessions. It is important that students form this habit in order to support the development of their study skills in preparation for external examinations. PREP tasks can take many different forms: consolidating classwork through further or extended questions, ‘interleaving’ tasks which ask the students to recall work covered a few weeks ago, ‘flipped learning’ tasks which prime the students with information ready for future teaching, the development of revision notes and study aids that summarise key topic areas or any other appropriate task the teacher sees fit.

It is important that students are assessed regularly so that they are given the opportunity to apply their class based understanding to the types of questions they will receive through external examinations. We believe that everybody benefits from this. The student has an opportunity to prepare for and experience the same type of questions they will see in their final examinations and it highlights for both the student and the teacher, areas of strength and weakness so that teaching may be adapted to better meet the learner's needs. It also provides the school with an opportunity to identify those groups not performing in line with expectations so that school wide intervention may be put into place. In addition to in class assessment there are also three periods of mock examinations, these take place in the June of Year 10 and the December and March of Year 11. At this point students experience the pressure of preparing for and sitting multiple exams in a short space of time.

hrough incisive monitoring of assessment data the school carefully creates intervention groups. We first focus on the ‘basics’ (students not achieving good progression in English and/or Mathematics), then widen this to include Science, Modern Foreign Languages and Humanities. We also look carefully at the performance of key sub-groups within the school, for example White British, Pupil Premium, Most Able, etc. Senior leaders hold regular meetings to discuss the progress of these students and teachers are required to indicate the wave 1 interventions that have been put in place to support these students. Attendance is also monitored closely with separate intervention in place where we recognise this is impacting on learning. Some students may be timetabled specific intervention lessons for English, Mathematics and Science during Year 11. We also look at how periods of PREP can be used differently to further support the progression of these students.

 

Key Stage 5

Our Tudor Park Trust curriculum offer at Key Stage 5 is supported by Logic Studio School and our external partner school - Reach Academy.  This allows us to run a broad range of viable classes. Specific subject offerings do vary from year to year depending primarily on where we feel we have ‘subject excellence’ and the requirements of our students.

The majority of students study three courses for the duration of their two year programme of study. Through careful transition work students may opt to ‘try’ subjects for a short period at the beginning of Year 12. We also hold ‘entry assessments’ in the first three weeks of our courses to ensure that students are placed on suitable courses. There are a number of different pathways that students can select from to suit their academic ability.

Students sit interim assessments at 6 points throughout the year. These are designed to support students in preparing for terminal examinations by regularly requiring students to collate their notes and test their knowledge. Data from these assessments are used to create RAP groups which are shared with staff. In class intervention and high quality differentiation are key to ensuring that learners needs are met. Students underachieving across two or three subjects are assigned to additional study groups for further support.

All students attend a Prep session at the beginning of the day followed by  the morning session, where students do not have timetabled lessons they have timetabled and supervised private study. This is to support the increase in independent work that is expected from students; for each hour of direct teaching the student receives they should be dedicating an hour of their time outside of class to consolidate and extend their understanding.

Further pastoral support, including CEIAG is delivered by Logic Studio School.

Literacy 

By the time they leave Springwest, students should be confident in the four strands of communication: reading, writing, speaking and listening - as they are necessary skills for later life.  With increasingly challenging expectations for reading - in the form of challenging texts - in many GCSEs as well as marks being awarded for spelling, punctuation and grammar, this is an academic necessity as well as an altruistic desire.

Outside of formal English lessons, where punctuation and grammar are taught in Key Stage 3 as a discrete subject in weekly lessons; students use form time to further develop their literacy, through silent reading and in some cases, literacy worksheets and games. In addition to this, students and staff of Key Stage 3 groups are expected to ‘DEAR’ - Drop Everything And Read - during one PREP session each week for twenty minutes. Throughout the corridors of the school, literacy boards support students with helpful hints and strategies as they walk to and from lessons. In this way, the importance of literacy is supported and championed throughout the school.

Staff of all subjects also take literacy into account when planning their units of work. This is bespoke for each department and is dependent on the literacy requirements of that particular subject. For example, vocabulary and spelling tests are an integral literacy requirement of MfL, whilst spelling of key terms and accurate use of subject terminology is reinforced in History through PREP tasks and lesson activities.

 

Numeracy

To support students with their numeracy and their mathematical confidence identified students take part in exciting and engaging activities during a form-time each week. Students practise their times tables with engaging games and activities, helped by KS4 students who help them increase in confidence and speed. In form time, there is an emphasis on fun numeracy competitions and functional skills as forms compete to make the most progress and win a form trip.

At Springwest, exciting problem solving doesn’t just stop when the lesson ends. Students at all points in the school enjoy taking part in the National Maths Challenge, and teams from the school travel into London to compete in the team challenges. We also host an annual Maths Feast at the school; an afternoon of interactive team challenges where students work together to solve a variety of problems against teams from other local schools. In addition to these exciting events, the Maths Department also run a problem solving trip to the British Museum where students work together to solve calculations written in hieroglyphs, find the distance a clock pendulum travels each year and  discover the height of egyptian statues when all but the giant stone arm has been lost in the desert.

Numeracy is important across the curriculum, and staff in all departments receive CPD on different methods and the importance of being positive role models for mathematics. We ensure that methods and approaches are consistent across different departments.  The Head of Numeracy also makes sure that Teaching Assistants receive training and support that will allow them to best support students with their numeracy.

Pastoral Curriculum

 

Form Time

All students have 3 form time sessions per week. In addition students have a Year and a Whole Academy assembly. Form time is carefully planned out to ensure purposeful and relevant use of time. In Years 7 &8 all  students have a timetable of activities and sessions revolving around numeracy & literacy tasks, news and current affairs (usually in the form of a quiz). In Year 8 students also have a weekly PHSE slot complemented by the regular Red Day provision throughput the year. Form time is also used to ensure students are prepared for their learning with the correct equipment and perfect uniform. Tutors use the At Springwest we… expectations to reinforce this. The assembly programme is led by a member of SLT and provides a series of rich, diverse and well-coordinated assemblies. Many members of staff lead on Whole Academy assemblies. At KS4 there is more bespoke provision during form time, to take into account exam preparation, revision and subject specific intervention.

 

PSHE

The personal development and  wellbeing of students always features as part of our academy key priorities. We believe that this is the bedrock of good mental and physical health. Consequently students can engage with their academic learning better. PHSE is currently delivered through 2 strands in Year 7. From September 2017 students will have a weekly PHSE lesson taught by the Year 7 tutor team. An example of the curriculum is the fiction text, ‘GrangeEnders’, which allows  students to learn relevant adolescent issues in a contemporary and engaging manner.   In addition to this Year 7 have Red Days throughout the year which allow students to explore PHSE topics in greater depth. In Year 8 & 9 PHSE is delivered through form time sessions c. every two weeks. These sessions are complemented by the assembly programme as well as the Red Day provision.

Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) focuses on the importance of stable and loving relationships including marriage for family life, as well as other relationships such as civil partnerships. SRE is about respect, love and care. SRE provides pupils with factual knowledge and an understanding of the influences on young people, encouraging them to be aware of the options open to them and to take charge of decisions about their own
behaviour. Some Sex Education content is delivered through Science lessons at KS3.

Most Able Groups

As part of our school’s commitment to ensure all students of all backgrounds and ability are sufficiently pushed to maximise their potentials, each year group has a Most Able group we refer to as ‘Springwest Scholars’. This is identified by the Achievement Co-ordinator using a range of identification methods. These methods involve the use of assessment data as well as soft data gathered by the Achievement Co-ordinators themselves. The aims of these groups differ from year to year - from supporting students in taking the step to secondary in Year 7 to supporting students with key revision and exam skills and academic progression in Year 11.

The overarching aim of these groups is to enrich, extend, expose and inspire. In many exams, the top marks are awarded to students who can draw from a wealth of social, economic, political and cultural knowledge in order to inform their ideas. However, we are also aware that extra-curricular provision should be intrinsically linked to the learning students complete in lessons. Therefore, sessions put on for students often allow them to extend their knowledge outside of the classroom, whilst simultaneously developing their cultural capital. Students are also offered opportunities to participate in educational visits. Students are also exposed to University and Further Education in a number of formats through Key Stages 3 and 4, including opportunities to visit local universities and education providers.

CEIAG

We have a duty to secure independent careers guidance for all students from year 8-13.  Careers guidance for young people should inspire and motivated them to fulfil their potential. We strive to help every pupil develop high aspirations and consider a broad and ambitious range of careers. We acknowledge that the one of the best ways to inspire every pupil is through the creation of real-life contacts with the world of work to help them better understand where different choices can take them in the future.

We build strong links with employers so that they can work with us to help boost young people’s attitudes and self-belief as well as their employability skills.  We inform pupils about the range of roles and opportunities available to them and we help them understand how to make this a reality.

We offer high quality work experience in that properly reflects individuals’ studies and strengths.  Students are allowed and are encouraged to find their own work experience placement.  This take place in the summer of Year 10.

In Year 11 students receive a 1-2-1 interview with professions from all employment sectors. This gives students the opportunity to gain valuable experience in self-confidence and self-promotion.
We make sure that students have broad access to advice on options available post-16.  We bring in apprenticeship providers to speak with students about the benefits of apprenticeships, the routes that are available and the qualifications that are needed.

We provide face-to-face advice and guidance from qualified and professional careers advisors.  This builds confidence and motivation in students and allows them to ask appropriate questions that apply to their future.
We work with local authorities to identify vulnerable young people - including those with special educational needs and those at risk of not participating post-16, and the services that are available to support them.

Transition

Any periods of change can be challenging to deal with, where that change can affect future paths through education or into careers the change can be all the more daunting. It is for this reason that we pride ourselves on the support that is offered to students at these key points. We always put the student first and ensure that decisions that are made are best suited to individual needs.

There is an identified member of SLT responsible for the academic transition between Key Stage 2 and 3. We meet all parents of our prospective Year 7 students in the May of Year 6. We feel it important for parents to have had direct contact with us so that we may clearly outline our expectations and also listen carefully to concerns that students or parents may have. In addition our SENCO and ACO for Year 7 visit each of our feeder primary schools in June and July to build up key data on our students.

Students prepare to make GCSE choices during Year 9. In the Spring Term we hold an information evening for parents to outline key details that they must be aware of when supporting their child in taking these next steps. Following this all students and parents are offer 1-2-1 interviews with our Senior Leadership team in which they can further discuss the implications of their desired option choices. The school expects students to select courses that will appropriately challenge students to meet the highest academic expectations, as such we reserve the right to have the final decision on exactly which subjects any student will study. Pathways are then created depending on the unique needs of any particular year group.

During Year 10 and 11 students receive talks through assemblies and dedicated career days that start to get them thinking about their Post-16 options. We also hold a Year 11 Transition even in September to offer advice and guidance to parents on this matter. Students complete surveys in the Summer of Year 10 and the Autumn of Year 11 to indicate probable destinations. All students have a 1-2-1 interviews with the Senior Leadership Team in October of Year 11 where reporting data is correlated to destination choice and further advice is given. We seek to retain as many students as we can where we feel our provision is best suited to their needs. Continued tracking of destination choices allows for staff to have meaningful and targeted meetings with students at regular intervals.

 We know that the passion our staff have for teaching their subject can make the difference in students applying to higher education. Students are also encourage into Wider Participation schemes such as ‘National Collaborative Outreach Programme’ (NCOP) as we firmly believe that university education should be the first choice for our most able learners. Our Sixth Form students are provided with a range of employer engagement activities and undergraduate preparation sessions by the pastoral team at Logic Studio School.

 

Celebrating Excellence and Progress

Students must be rewarded for their academic successes and our Behaviour Policy sets out clearly how staff do this. Alongside class teacher recognition regular rewards given out at Year assemblies to celebrate achievement and good attendance. In addition Curriculum and Senior Leaders regularly reward students for their current progress and effort. Every student in the school has the opportunity to gain bronze, silver or gold awards for positive reward points gathered through our PARS tracking system.

The school holds an two annual Celebration of Success evenings; in January to celebrate KS3 progress and excellence in the Arts and in July to formally recognise the effort, achievement and progress of students across all Key Stages. Governor awards are given to celebrate students who have most especially demonstrated our values: Courage and Determination, Friendship and Equality, Inspiration and Excellence.

Additional Curriculum

The Academy has two Local Authority resourced Centres which provide specialist provision for students with physical disabilities and autism. In addition, the academy through its own resources caters for students with low levels of learning or who are vulnerable. Fundamental to the work of all departments is the consideration of the whole child facilitating the development of responsible, fulfilled adults who are able to contribute to and function independently in society.

All four departments use multiple approaches when delivering programmes because they enable teachers and TAs (teaching assistants) to respond to personal learning styles and preferences and a combination of approaches is more effective than single approaches alone. The use of intensive interaction and a ‘multi-sensory’ based approach to teaching is used. Responding to individual difference is crucial. Department staff liaise with other areas of SEN, pastoral staff, EAL staff, mainstream departments and external agencies/therapists to better inform the provision and planning of department support.

Class lessons are differentiated to meet the different cognitive levels as well as specific SEN within the classes.  The amount and frequency of support depends upon the severity of need and the type of programme they will be completing.

Staff use data and knowledge of students to plan individual programmes which are reviewed at the end of each timetable block or intervention.

Students have access to a team of support, this includes Speech and Language Therapists, Physiotherapists Occupational Therapists. They focus on supporting physical development and independence across the school and all language and communication needs. We can also access other types of support from outside agencies when necessary. Programmes are delivered by therapists or TAs following the therapist’s direction.

Key Stage 4 students for whom the full Key Stage 4 curriculum may be too challenging, are supported via the SEND Foundation Programme which enables them to sit an appropriate number of GCSEs/Entry Level Certificates with relevant support and to focus on other life skills in preparation for college, work and future life. Small group work also takes place with these students to address individual SEND needs, back up the GCSE/Entry Level work of the mainstream maths department and the skills required for the English GCSE/Entry Level and to guide students in study skills. Some students who follow the full complement of GCSEs but who may need some support, can access additional interventions.

ARC (Autistic Resource Centre)

We cater for students who have been assessed as being on the Autistic Spectrum, and would benefit from access to mainstream curriculum.

The curriculum for ARC students is modified to focus on communication, behaviour and social interaction. Emphasis is also given to developing life skills. All students have access to the full National Curriculum at Key Stage 3 and 4 and are included in mainstream lessons (access varies according to needs). All ASD students have access to specialised programmes tailored for them—this often includes lessons in small groups taught by a specialist teachers and TAs.

Withdrawal support

  • Group programmes - Brain Gym
  • 1:1 or small group programmes - literacy and numeracy
  • Small group self-esteem programmes and social skills programmes
  • 1:1 and group programmes - Anxiety management, yoga and relaxation
  • 1:1 and group programmes- Study and revision skills and subject specific catch-up
  • Group programmes- Model Me, Social Thinking and Language

 

The Centre (Centre for Students with a Physical Disability)

The Centre enables students with a wide range of often complex physical and sensory needs to access the mainstream curriculum with reasonable adjustments according to need.

Students support by The Centre access withdrawal support programmes depending on the need for additional support/intervention. These programmes include, but are not limited to those below:

KS3, KS4 and KS5 withdrawal support

  • 1:1 or small group programmes - literacy and numeracy
  • 1: 1 Mentoring programmes delivered by past pupils
  • Small group self-esteem programmes and social skills programmes
  • 1:1 and group programmes- Study and revision skills and subject specific catch-up

 

Supportive Education Department

The department focuses on supporting students’ with moderate, general and specific learning difficulties. The Supportive Education Department provides learning support for students at Key Stage 3 and Key stage 4 and caters for a range of specific, general and moderate learning difficulties. Support is provided in a variety of different ways depending on need.

KS3 and KS4 withdrawal support (several blocks of support timetabled throughout the year)

Small group support for both numeracy and literacy needs focusing on IEP targets and/or underpinning the requirements of mainstream courses, eg GCSE maths and English.

  • 1:1 specific programmes – Catch Up Literacy, Toe by Toe, Stairway to Spelling, High 5 Reading, Dyslexia support (may require continuous support), Lexia, paired reading.
  • Small group targeted reading programmes – Smart Reading, Rapid Reading.
  • Year 7 and 8 bottom sets English classes
  • Highly differentiated to meet the range and concentration of needs in the class. As much as is appropriate, the students follow an adapted version of the mainstream English curriculum.

The Hub (provision for vulnerable students)

 Most students supported by the Hub have a statement/EHCP relating to complex needs.

Hub provision is very much student led. In this way, programmes and support is flexible and directed by current and emerging needs of Hub students. Due to some of the emotional and communication difficulties and challenging behaviour of some students, provision can be disrupted in order to deal with immediate needs of a student in crisis. In this case, the least amount of disruption is managed by teachers and TAs in order to minimise impact on other students but also meet needs of student in crisis. Below outlines the types of programmes and support provided by the Hub.

KS3 and KS4 withdrawal support

  • 1:1 fine motor skills and handwriting.
  • Small group self-esteem programmes, social skills programmes, behaviour management, review of the week and target setting
  • 1: 1 mentoring programmes

EAL

 New arrivals in KS3 who are beginners in English attend six lessons a week to help them acquire language.  The course focuses on key language needed for subjects across the curriculum, as well as high frequency vocabulary. Students also learn the grammar of the language to help develop their writing skill. In addition, they attend EAL PREP where they have access to reading books appropriate to their level of English. They are assessed by the National EAL Stages.  

Early learners who are not beginners, but are new to the school and country, attend four lessons a week. The lessons focus on the writing skill to enable students to write at paragraph level, EAL Stage 2, and so attain greater access to the curriculum. Students working towards EAL Stage 3 have two lessons week to develop their writing skill to essay level. They also have a reading lesson with their reading age being assessed by the whole school reading tests. The number of EAL lessons is steadily reduced as they progress through the EAL Stages at KS3 in order to give them a phased access to mainstream lessons and culture.  

At KS4 the school has two EAL option classes according to the level of language ability. The criteria for selection is to cater for late arrivals in KS4 who are early learners, and also students who need extra English language input to secure the GCSE English language exam. In addition to teaching language skills needed for the new GCSE English Language exams, these classes take the accredited ESL IGCSE. It is accepted by many universities in the UK as an alternative English language examination for students who have English as their second language.

A full outline of our curriculum for each year group can be seen below. Please note that as mathematics is taught by ‘stage, not age’ we have included the information in a separate tab.

If you want any more detail on the curriculum please email - info@springwestacademy.org -  or contact your child's Achievement Co-ordinator.